2017 national report card on student proficiency shows little progress in D.C.

Today, the 2017 National Assessment of Educational Progress test scores are being released and it appears that District of Columbia students have made little progress compared to when these results were revealed a couple of years ago.  In addition, the achievement gap between rich and poor is basically unchanged.

Let’s get right to the results for D.C. on this examination known as the “Nation’s Report Card.”  In 2015, the proficiency rate for fourth grade white students in math was 85 percent.  Last year it was 80.  For black students the math proficiency rate was 20 percent in 2015 and in 2017 it was 23 percent.  Hispanic students scored 28 percent proficiency in 2017, and that number was 30 percent in 2015.  For students living in poverty, the math proficiency rate was 18 percent in 2015 and two years later it stands at 22 percent.

In reading, white students as a group were 77 percent proficient in the fourth grade for 2017 compared to 81 percent in 2015.  Black students went from 18 percent proficient in 2015 to 11 percent last year.  Hispanic students went down from 22 percent proficient in 2015 to 18 percent proficient in 2017, and those qualifying for free or reduced lunch went from 14 percent proficient in reading in 2015 to 11 percent in 2017.

For the eighth grade the patterns are basically the same.  In math, white proficiency was at 74 percent proficiency in 2015; it went to 77 percent proficiency in 2017.  For black students the math proficiency was basically the same at 12 percent in 2017 and 13 percent in 2015.  Hispanic student results were 19 percent proficient in 2015 and 18 percent in 2017.  Low-income students were 11 percent proficient in 2015 and 10 percent proficient in 2017.

The reading results for eighth grade included white students being 76 percent proficient in 2015 and 77 percent proficient in 2017.  Black students went from 12 percent proficiency in 2015 to 11 percent in 2017.  Hispanic students went down a point from 19 percent proficient in 2015 to 18 percent proficient a couple of years ago.  Low-income students remained almost the same regarding proficiency, going from 10 percent in 2015 to 11 percent in 2017.

If we take a look at trends over time, students in the nation’s capital continue to make exceedingly slow improvements compared to national averages.  The city is eight points below the average score in fourth grade math and seven points away from the mean in reading.  These are the lowest variances ever recorded, but that’s only one point from the previous report card.  In fourth grade math, the difference from the national average is 16 points, again a record low.  But for fourth grade reading, the D.C. average went up from 2015 going to a variance of 19 points in 2017 from 16 percent in 2015.

The Washington D.C. results on the NAEP roughly follow the pattern seen across the U.S.  Writing for the Washington Post, 

“Averages for fourth- and eighth-graders on the National Assessment of Educational Progress, also called the Nation’s Report Card, were mostly unchanged between 2015 and 2017. The exception was eighth-grade reading scores, which rose slightly.

But scores for the bottom 25 percent of students dropped slightly in all but eighth-grade reading. Scores for the top quartile rose slightly in eighth-grade reading and math.”

The bottom line of all this data is that if you are an affluent student in the District you are doing quite well academically.  If you are not so fortunate to be born into a well-off family, then the odds of being proficient in math and reading is low.

Nothing has really changed.