D.C. charter schools turn to city for help in re-opening

I have such mixed feelings about District of Columbia schools re-opening in the midst of this pandemic. Working in healthcare, I see the highly contagious nature of Covid-19. In addition, my wife and I have a grandson going through the distance learning experience with Montgomery County public schools. It has been difficult for us because we have had to severely limit our social interactions with our family, and it has been challenging for our daughter and her husband with two young kids at home.

However, the situation has not been nearly as devastating as it has been for so many people across the United States and world. In this environment, I do not think there is any one answer for re-opening our schools. While this is an important goal, especially for those students living in poverty or who have special needs, we cannot put the health and safety of our community at risk. I write this with the knowledge that some charters have brought a limited number of its scholars back to school for in-person learning.

Towards the aim of bringing all children back to the classroom, the DC Charter School Alliance issued a press release yesterday, signed by 70 charter leaders, calling on the city to provide resources for placing medical professionals in schools, guidance around public health procedures, and mechanisms for performing coronavirus testing of pupils and adults. I am not sure about the rationale for such a document. In the past, when charter schools needed to accomplish a common goal, they would take the initiative and figure it out themselves. It is a clear indicator about how murky the current situation is that the Alliance is not able to work with these schools to devise and implement uniform recommended operating procedures.

The editors of the Washington Post have called for a concerted effort to re-open schools. They write:

“There needs to be more urgency in getting students back in the classroom. If grocery stores and hair salons and gyms and restaurants can adapt, why is there not similar impetus to get children back to school in a way that is safe for them and their teachers?”

Grocery stores have adopted by offering more delivery and the ability to pick up orders curbside. Hair salons, gyms, and restaurants have severely reduced the number of people who can be utilize these services at one time while implementing personal protective equipment protocols. Statements like the one by the Post editors offering simple recipes to what ails us now do not help.

I tutor a middle school student on-line through the Latino Student Fund. She attends the National Cathedral School. Last Monday, NCS started bringing its students back for alternating weeks learning in person and remotely. Perhaps we can gain insight from their example as to how to do this with the best interest of everyone in mind.

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